Our Latest News

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Shipwreck identified as the Viola

19/07/2016

Timber samples from a ship wrecked on Tasmania's East Coast nearly 160 years ago have been identified as the Canadian-built brig Viola.More

Prosecution for Stanley penguin deaths

15/07/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and the Circular Head Council have conducted a joint investigation after 18 little penguins were found dead near a rookery in Stanley on the State's North-West coast last week.More

Fishing

Fishing in Tasmania's National Parks and Reserves

A fishing trip in Tasmania can take you to some of the most beautiful wilderness areas on Earth. The Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and its many lakes, tarns, rivers and streams offer anglers one of the world’s greatest trout fishing venues. Much of Tasmania has an equally wild and pristine coast, with more coastline per unit area than any other State in Australia. Its waters include the highest known marine plant diversity in the world. Several marine reserves around the coast of Tasmania are areas where fishing is prohibited or restricted, thereby ensuring the long-term ecological viability of Tasmania's marine environments.

Tasmania has a world-class system of national parks and reserves that protect some of the most intact natural ecosystems in Australia. Park entry fees apply in national parks.

When visiting these sensitive regions, please play your part in ensuring their future by following leave no trace guidelines. These are largely common sense, such as carrying out what you carry in, walking on formed tracks wherever possible, and pitching tents on established sites rather than creating a new one. Much of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area is a fuel stove only area – open fires are not permitted, and in many areas, including all national parks and reserves, live bait cannot be collected – use lures or flies.

When walking on beaches, please be aware that you are sharing the beach with shore-nesting birds. Walk below the high-tide mark.

To minimise the spread of the root rot fungus start your walk with clean gear, including boots, tent pegs, gaiters and tent floor; use washdown stations where provided; and wash your gear at the end of a trip.

If fishing in an area where a toilet exists please use it! If there is no toilet, walk 100m away from any water, dig a 15cm hole and bury your waste and the toilet paper as well.

By following these simple guidelines you will assist in ensuring the long-term viability of Tasmania’s marine and freshwater fisheries, and our unique natural heritage. Remember, when fishing in Tasmania, fish for the future. Future anglers will thank you.

For Further Information

Inland Fisheries Service - the web site of the Inland Fisheries Service has a variety of information on Tasmania's freshwater fisheries.

Sea Fishing & Aquaculture - the Department of Primary Industries and Water's comprehensive web site includes recreational and commercial fishing, fish species information, permit fisheries, plus Fishcare.

Tasmanian Fishery provides a wealth of information and advice on fishing for trout by both fly and lure.