Our Latest News

Draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan

15/01/2015

The Tasmanian Government has today released a draft of the updated Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan.More

New sign celebrates the Overland Track experience

14/01/2015

In the 1960s, visitor information signs at Lake St Clair warned of no trapping, hunting, shooting, picking shrubs, cutting timber and grazing stock. Times have changed, with a new sign installation helping Overland Track walkers to celebrate their walk.More

Overland trek guide for young adventurers

14/01/2015

Of the 8000 people who tackle the world-famous Overland Track each year, almost one in ten is under 18 years old. A new publication from the Parks and Wildlife Service recognises that the experience is different for children.More

Park Ideas - Tamar Island Wetlands Centre

Get close to the mudflats, lagoons and islands of this magnificent wetlands area close to Launceston

For enquiries please find all Tamar Island contacts on the Office locations and contacts page. 

Lots of information for school and other groups who plan to visit the wetlands can be found at the Tamar Island Wetlands Centre webpage.

Guided activities 

The volunteer visitor guides may offer talks and activities on the following:

• raptors and birds in general 
• caring for native wildlife
• wetland biodiversity 
• macro-invertebrate identification. 

To book a talk, please call the Interpretation Centre at least a week before your visit.

 

Things you can do

Walk 

Stroll to Tamar Island along an easy access boardwalk. Walk 0.5 km out to see the lagoon life platform or 1.5 km out to the historic island. 

Visit the Interpretation Centre and learn about the cultural and natural history of the site. 

Look out for and try to identify the wrecks sunk last century. 

Take a picnic or have a barbecue on the island. 

Look for birds hiding in the reeds, wading in the lagoons or perching on the bridges. 

Sit quietly in the bird hide and watch the birds in the wetlands.  

Things you might be really lucky to see and hear

Tamar Wetlands is home to many permanent and visiting animals. Some are rare and endangered whilst others are very shy and elusive. If you are lucky, you might see some of these special residents including: a green and gold frog; a white-bellied sea eagle; a platypus; or birds that migrate between Tasmania and China and Japan, like the crested term and the curlew sandpiper. To help you identify the many sounds of the wetlands, the Interpretation Centre has tapes and CDs which you can listen to, or reference books to read before you go on your walk.