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Our Latest News

Tasmanian fuel reduction program an Australian first

23/03/2015

Tasmanian communities will be safer from the threat of bushfires, with a ground-breaking new $28.5 million program of fuel reduction burns announced today.More

Three Capes Track hut contracts awarded

19/03/2015

Two Tasmanian companies have been awarded contracts worth a total of $6.5 million to construct the huts on the Three Capes Track.More

Temporary access changes for The Nut

18/03/2015

Access to the tracks at the summit of The Nut State Reserve at Stanley will be by the chairlift only, from Monday 23 March to Friday 27 March, 2015, due to safety works being undertaken on the Zig Zag track.

More

Park Ideas - Tamar Island Wetlands Centre

Get close to the mudflats, lagoons and islands of this magnificent wetlands area close to Launceston

For enquiries please find all Tamar Island contacts on the Office locations and contacts page. 

Lots of information for school and other groups who plan to visit the wetlands can be found at the Tamar Island Wetlands Centre webpage.

Guided activities 

The volunteer visitor guides may offer talks and activities on the following:

• raptors and birds in general 
• caring for native wildlife
• wetland biodiversity 
• macro-invertebrate identification. 

To book a talk, please call the Interpretation Centre at least a week before your visit.

 

Things you can do

Walk 

Stroll to Tamar Island along an easy access boardwalk. Walk 0.5 km out to see the lagoon life platform or 1.5 km out to the historic island. 

Visit the Interpretation Centre and learn about the cultural and natural history of the site. 

Look out for and try to identify the wrecks sunk last century. 

Take a picnic or have a barbecue on the island. 

Look for birds hiding in the reeds, wading in the lagoons or perching on the bridges. 

Sit quietly in the bird hide and watch the birds in the wetlands.  

Things you might be really lucky to see and hear

Tamar Wetlands is home to many permanent and visiting animals. Some are rare and endangered whilst others are very shy and elusive. If you are lucky, you might see some of these special residents including: a green and gold frog; a white-bellied sea eagle; a platypus; or birds that migrate between Tasmania and China and Japan, like the crested term and the curlew sandpiper. To help you identify the many sounds of the wetlands, the Interpretation Centre has tapes and CDs which you can listen to, or reference books to read before you go on your walk.