Our Latest News

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Burnie

17/06/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Three Capes Track special offer

16/06/2016

The centenary of national parks in Tasmania is being celebrated with a special offer to walk the Three Capes Track for only $250 per person.More

Bruny Island tourism improvements

14/06/2016

Two of Bruny Island's major tourism drawcards, The Neck and the South Bruny Lighthouse site, are being upgraded by the Parks and Wildlife Service.

More

Park Ideas - Tamar Island Wetlands Centre

Get close to the mudflats, lagoons and islands of this magnificent wetlands area close to Launceston

For enquiries please find all Tamar Island contacts on the Office locations and contacts page. 

Lots of information for school and other groups who plan to visit the wetlands can be found at the Tamar Island Wetlands Centre webpage.

Guided activities 

The volunteer visitor guides may offer talks and activities on the following:

• raptors and birds in general 
• caring for native wildlife
• wetland biodiversity 
• macro-invertebrate identification. 

To book a talk, please call the Interpretation Centre at least a week before your visit.

 

Things you can do

Walk 

Stroll to Tamar Island along an easy access boardwalk. Walk 0.5 km out to see the lagoon life platform or 1.5 km out to the historic island. 

Visit the Interpretation Centre and learn about the cultural and natural history of the site. 

Look out for and try to identify the wrecks sunk last century. 

Take a picnic or have a barbecue on the island. 

Look for birds hiding in the reeds, wading in the lagoons or perching on the bridges. 

Sit quietly in the bird hide and watch the birds in the wetlands.  

Things you might be really lucky to see and hear

Tamar Wetlands is home to many permanent and visiting animals. Some are rare and endangered whilst others are very shy and elusive. If you are lucky, you might see some of these special residents including: a green and gold frog; a white-bellied sea eagle; a platypus; or birds that migrate between Tasmania and China and Japan, like the crested term and the curlew sandpiper. To help you identify the many sounds of the wetlands, the Interpretation Centre has tapes and CDs which you can listen to, or reference books to read before you go on your walk.