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Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Wineglass Bay track upgrade complete

16/10/2017

One of Tasmania's most iconic tourism experiences, the walk to Wineglass Bay from the lookout to the beach, has now re-opened after a $500,000 upgrade initiated through the Government's Tourism Infrastructure in Parks fund.
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Tourism opportunity for Tasman Island

12/10/2017

Tourists could soon enjoy the beautiful Tasman National Park from the air, as a change to the management plan could open it up for sensitive and appropriate aircraft access.More

Volunteers help to free stranded whales and dolphins on King Island

05/11/2012

Hopes remain high for 15 whales and dolphins that survived strandings of more than 80 animals on King Island and nearby New Year Island at the weekend.


Volunteers joined Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) staff to free surviving bottlenose dolphins that beached at Quarantine Bay on the north-west coast of King Island on Friday, and dolphins and long-finned pilot whales that stranded on neighbouring New Year Island on Saturday.


DPIPWE staff including King Island ranger in charge Shelley Davison and marine biologists Rachael Alderman and Kris Carlyon managed the stranding with the help of about 20 King Island volunteers, including a group of surfers visiting from Geelong.


Rachael Alderman said 42 whales and 25 dolphins had died, with two whales and 13 dolphins surviving the two strandings.


One whale that re-beached on New Year Island was monitored and stabilised on Sunday before it was successfully returned to the water on Sunday evening.


Dr Alderman said it was not uncommon for whales and dolphins to re-strand and likely locations in the area were being checked.


She said it was not known why the animals had beached.


"Both the long-finned whales and bottlenose dolphins are non-migratory species and were probably feeding in the area," Dr Alderman said.


"A combination of factors, including tides, currents and coastline, may have confused their navigation systems.


"The whales and dolphins were predominantly adults but there were some younger animals. There were females and males among the dead and survivors.


Shelley Davison said that the volunteers were the key to successfully returning the stranded animals to the water.


“At first all we were able to do was make the animals comfortable, but once we got more volunteers, we were able to begin returning them to the water. The volunteers were fantastic; they spent a lot of time in the water getting the whales’ and dolphins’ muscles working again so they were able to swim off,” she said.


The whales and dolphins will be left to decompose naturally as they are in remote locations.


A First Response Whale Stranding training course was held at King Island in 2010 and a refresher course is planned for 24 November 2012.

Volunteers help to free stranded whales and dolphins on King Island

King Island ranger Shelley Davison monitoring the re-beached pilot whale on New Year Island.

Volunteers help to free stranded whales and dolphins on King Island

Stranded long-finned pilot whales and dolphins at New Year Island.

Volunteers help to free stranded whales and dolphins on King Island

The shallow beach where the whales and dolphins came ashore on New Year Island.

Volunteers help to free stranded whales and dolphins on King Island

Volunteers were critical to the rescue effort. They spent hours in the water preparing animals for release.