Our Latest News

New lease of life for original lighthouse vents

15/05/2018

As part of the ongoing conservation of the Cape Bruny and Maatsuyker Island lighthouses, a team effort has been underway to restore the original bronze vents from the lighthouses' lantern rooms.More

Record visitor numbers at Highfield Historic Site

09/05/2018

Visitation numbers at Highfield Historic Site in Stanley have reached a record high, with 12,535 people visiting in the 12 months ending March 2018.More

Cradle Mountain shuttle bus tender awarded

08/05/2018

A new bus fleet featuring environmentally friendly technology and vehicles with improved accessibility and increased capacity will help to meet increasing visitor numbers following the awarding of the tender to McDermott Coaches.More

Marine Reserves

Tasmania has approximately 5 400 kilometres of coastline - more coastline per unit area than any other State in Australia.

The geographical position and varying climatic conditions of Tasmania, together with the influence of ocean currents, combine to produce a marine environment recognised as one of the most biologically diverse in the world. This rich variety of marine life includes kelp forests, seagrass beds and sponge gardens each with their own communities of fish and invertebrates, including  a range of special creatures from sea dragons and fairy penguins to great white sharks and migrating whales. Tasmanian waters include a province with the highest known marine plant diversity in the world. 

The temperate south marine environment surrounding Tasmania has been geographically and climatically isolated for around 35 million years. About 80–90% of species of most marine groups are endemic, compared to only 10% of species in most groups in northern tropical waters. As a result, the marine environment of Tasmania and similar southern areas is in many ways more significant in world terms than tropical areas such as the Great Barrier Reef.

The Tasmanian Reserve Estate includes 135,100 hectares in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), of which Macquarie Island MPA is 81,946 hectares.  There are a further 48,500 hectares under reserve in other areas of the marine and estuarine environments.  In total 7.9% of Tasmania’s State coastal waters is reserved, however only 4.2% is in no-take areas and the majority of this is concentrated around subantarctic Macquarie Island. Only 1.1% of Tasmania’s immediate coastal waters are fully protected in no-take areas.

The marine reserves of Tasmania offer a taste of this unique diversity.  
Marine Reserves
 
Image Map of Tasmania's Marine Reserves

Tinderbox Marine Reserve
Visitor Guide
Tinderbox offers visitors of all ages a safe introduction to the underwater world.

Maria Island Marine Reserve
Visitor Guide 
Discover a spectacular array of marine life at Maria Island Marine Reserve.

Ninepin Point Marine Reserve
Visitor Guide
Ninepin Point protects an unusual underwater world where light is cut off by tannin-stained water.

Governor Island Marine Reserve
Visitor Guide
A spectacular reserve which offers magnificent sponge gardens and much more.

Kent Group Marine Reserve
Visitor Guide
These Bass Strait islands are unusually rich in fish species, having the highest diversity in Tasmania.

Port Davey Marine Reserve 
Set in the wilderness of southwest Tasmania, this remote region supports unique marine communities.

Macquarie Island Marine Reserve 
The sub-antarctic Macquarie Island Marine Nature Reserve occupies all of Macquarie Island's waters from 0-3 nautical miles.


Marine Conservation Areas

Video Gallery 
Discover the marine environment of Tasmania.

Caring for our Marine Reserves
A practical guide to ensuring that your visit will leave no impact on our fragile marine reserves.

Managing our Marine Reserves
A summary of the issues involved in the management of Tasmania's Marine Reserves.

Beneath Tasmanian Waters Slideshow

Common gurnard perch

Red Velvetfish

Hermit crab

Tasmanian Numbfish

Take a journey beneath Tasmanian waters to discover remarkable marine life with this slideshow.