Our Latest News

Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access


Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites


Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day


'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Forty-Spotted Pardalote, Pardalotus quadragintus

40-spotted pardalote

Forty-spotted pardalote
(Photo by Dave Watts)


One of the smallest birds in Australia, the endemic Forty-spotted Pardalote is threatened with extinction. For full details of its plight, see our threatened species pages.

The Forty-spotted Pardalote belongs to a group known as 'diamond birds' because of their tiny, jewel-like appearance. Measuring about 90 - 100 mm, the body is light olive green with pale yellow around the eye and on the rump. The wings are black with distinctive white dots. Unlike its close relative, the spotted pardalote, there are no head markings.


Forty-spotted Pardalotes live in dry eucalypt forests and woodlands only where white gum (Eucalyptus viminalis) occurs.

The species can sometimes be seen at Maria Island National Park, the Labillardiere Peninsula in South Bruny National Park and the Peter Murrell Reserve near Kingston.


They feed on a variety of insects, and also lerps (a protective insect coating) and manna, a sugary secretion produced by the tree in response to insect attack. The birds are called 'foliage gleaners' because of the way they pick the insects from the leaves and branches.


The nest is  built of fine bark and usually placed in the hollow of a mature tree. Four white, lustrous eggs are laid.


The call is a low pitched 'where... where... where... where'.

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania


The rare and threatened Forty-spotted Pardalote is found in suitable habitat in a few, scattered eastern and southern localities, including Maria Island, Bruny Island, Tinderbox and Flinders Island.