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Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access


Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites


Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day


'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Yellow-throated Honeyeater, Lichenostomus flavicollis

Yellow-throated honeyeaterYellow-throated Honeyeater
(Photography by Dave Watts)


The endemic Yellow-throated Honeyeater is a common resident throughout Tasmania. It is a medium sized bird, up to 210mm, with  olive-green colouring on the wings and back and speckled yellow-grey underparts. The dark grey crown and face contrasts with a rich yellow chin and throat.

Females are smaller than males. Young birds are very similar to adults, but duller overall.


Usually seen singly or in pairs, often foraging on the trunks or foliage of large trees. Its preferred habitat is wet and dry eucalypt forest, alpine woodland and coastal heath. It is also commonly seen in gardens and parks.


The Yellow-throated Honeyeater feeds mainly on seasonally available insects and nectar, and occasionally on fruit and seeds. It feeds at all levels of the canopy, foraging on foliage, bark and flowers for insects and nectar.


Males hold territories year-round,  defending them against others of their own species as well as other birds – particularly other honeyeaters. The species breeds from August to December, and lays two to three spotted pinkish eggs in a cup-shaped nest made from closely woven grass, bark and spider-web, and is lined with fur or hair collected from live animals - including humans! The nest, which is built by the female, is usually within a metre of the ground amongst dense shrubs. The male will feed nestlings if the female starts a second brood.


Its call is a loud, metallic "tonk tonk tonk".

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania


Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania.