Our Latest News

Campfire restrictions extended due to increasing fire risk

19/01/2018

In the interests of public safety, the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) has brought in extensive campfire restrictions as the fire risk continues to increase this summer.More

Improved toilet facilities at Bruny Island

16/01/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has completed work on a new toilet facility at the Bruny Island Neck Game Reserve.More

Further upgrade to South Coast Track

05/01/2018

The South Coast Track is one of Tasmania's great bushwalks, and the completion of recent upgrades has significantly improved the user experience along the track before the start of the peak walking season.More

Yellow wattlebird, Anthochaera paradoxa

Yellow wattlebirdYellow Wattlebird
(Photography by Dave Watts)

Description

The Yellow Wattlebird is Australia's largest honeyeater (380-480 mm). It is found only in Tasmania. The species has a grey-brown plumage streaked with white. The belly is yellow. It has distinctive yellow "wattles" (long, pendulous lobes) hanging from behind the ear. Both sexes are similar in appearance.

Habitat

The Yellow Wattlebird occurs singularly or in pairs in eucalypt forest and woodland. It is a common species, often seen in gardens.

Diet

The Yellow Wattlebird feeds on insects and nectar.

Breeding

The nest is large, cup-shaped and is comprised of twigs, bark and leaves and is lined with feathers. It is placed high within a tree or shrub. Two to three eggs are laid.

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Call

The call is a loud, gutteral sound that has been likened to a person vomiting!

Distribution

Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania, except Flinders Island and the west coast.