Our Latest News

Join us for the Power of Parks forum at Launceston

22/07/2016

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) in partnership with the University of Tasmania is exploring The Power of Parks through a series of UTAS public forums celebrating the benefits that parks and reserves provide to Tasmania's overall identify.More

Shipwreck identified as the Viola

19/07/2016

Timber samples from a ship wrecked on Tasmania's East Coast nearly 160 years ago have been identified as the Canadian-built brig Viola.More

Prosecution for Stanley penguin deaths

15/07/2016

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) and the Circular Head Council have conducted a joint investigation after 18 little penguins were found dead near a rookery in Stanley on the State's North-West coast last week.More

Enchanted Walk

30. Enchanted Walk

time 20 minute circuit (1.1km circuit)
access Road C132. 1 hour from Sheffield; 1.25 hours from Devonport. See map
fees Park entry fees apply.
facilities Picnic and toilet facilities nearby
grade Level 2.
what to take Group A items are required
cautions Supervise children, flowing water, severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

A walk to suit all age groups. For company there’s a cascading river, wombat burrows and magical old-growth rainforest. The walk is located in Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park

Highlights

The walk will take you through buttongrass moorland before entering cool temperate rainforest along the edges of Pencil Pine Creek. Along the track are three interpretive tunnels that kids and kids at heart will find fun to crawl through!

Wombat Burrows  (41º 35' 45" S   145º 55' 34" E)
Along the western bank of the Pencil Pine Creek you will come across several wombat burrows just on the edge of the track. Wombats do occur in the area, although you are more likely to see them around dusk and dawn. The species occurring in Tasmania, the common wombat, is one of three species found in Australia.

The wombat is the largest burrowing mammal. Wombats often dig their burrows in the areas above creeks and gullies. Burrows can be up to 20 m long and more than 2 m below the ground.

The wombats powerful legs and long, strong claws are used in the excavation of burrows. Wombats are unique among marsupials in having constantly growing upper and lower incisors (front teeth), like a beaver. This allows the wombat to cut through obstructions while burrowing. Being marsupials, female wombats have a pouch that in their case opens backward to prevent dirt and debris entering while burrowing!