Our Latest News

Improved access to a World Heritage view

24/07/2017

An upgrade of the popular viewing platform on the shore of Lake St Clair has now been completed, improving disability access to one of the finest viewing points of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Improved access to two of the North-west's natural wonders

24/07/2017

The North-west is home to some of Tasmania's most stunning natural attractions, and we are pleased to announce upgrades have now been completed at Trowutta Arch and Dip Falls.More

Overland Track bookings open with a rush

18/07/2017

Tasmania's iconic world-renowned bushwalks are a key driver behind the boom in visitor numbers to the state, and bookings for the Overland Track walking season have opened with a rush for the peak summer period.More

Wombat Mange

The population of wombats in the area west of the Tamar River and in Narawntapu National Park reduced markedly between 2010 and 2016. The cause of this decline has been attributed to a severe outbreak of mange.

Sarcoptic mange is a skin infection in mammals that is caused by a burrowing parasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Wombat burrows are believed to have good conditions for the survival of mites and the transfer of mites between wombats.

Signs of mange infection include itching, scratching, skin thickening and crusting, loss of hair and body condition. Mange infections usually present as crusty skin lesions on the sides and legs of wombats. Scabs can also form around the eyes and ears, impacting on the animal’s sight and hearing.

Wombats were previously a common species in Narawntapu National Park. Although mange has been present in the park for decades, there was an outbreak of mange in 2006 following a severe drought. Since then mange has resulted in a substantial reduction in wombat numbers.

To learn more about mange and what is being done to help the wombat, see the DPIPWE page on mange.