Our Latest News

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Maintaining vigilance with campfires

03/11/2017

Parks and Wildlife Service staff have thanked the many campers who have heeded the restrictions placed on campfires and pot fires, but ask that park and reserve visitors continue to take care while the fire risk remains high in certain areas of the State.More

Striped Dolphin

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Striped Dolphins are also known as the blue-white dolphin as they have blue and white lateral stripes that originate at their eyes. The belly is lighter than the sides and they have a blue grey dorsal cape. They have a long, well defined beak and tall, sickle-shaped dorsal fin. They reach up to 2.6m in length although most are around 2m in length. Striped Dolphins live in large pods that can be made up of mixed ages and sexes or subadults and may be in schools of several thousand. They are active and conspicuous at sea and will often bow ride, swim upside down or leap about 6m out of the water to do backward somersaults.

General Information

Striped Dolphins mature as teenagers and can live for nearly sixty years. They are a temperate to tropical species so were not typically a Tasmanian species although this may change with increased water temperatures. All sightings have been where the sea surface temperature exceeds 25 degrees. They generally calve every four years and newborns are about 1m long and are weaned by three years at about 1.7m. They generally feed on smaller fish, shrimp and squid.

Stranding Information

Striped Dolphins are infrequent stranders in Australian waters with records mostly from Western Australia, New South Wales and Queensland. Tasmania has at least two recorded strandings for a total of seven individuals.