Our Latest News

Campfire restrictions extended due to increasing fire risk

19/01/2018

In the interests of public safety, the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) has brought in extensive campfire restrictions as the fire risk continues to increase this summer.More

Improved toilet facilities at Bruny Island

16/01/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has completed work on a new toilet facility at the Bruny Island Neck Game Reserve.More

Further upgrade to South Coast Track

05/01/2018

The South Coast Track is one of Tasmania's great bushwalks, and the completion of recent upgrades has significantly improved the user experience along the track before the start of the peak walking season.More

Arnouxs Beaked Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Like other beaked whales, Arnouxs Beaked Whales have a dolphin-like beak with the lower jaw extending past the upper jaw. Both sexes have a pair of triangular teeth at the jaw tip. Older animals have a second pair set further back. They have rounded flippers, a tail fluke without notch and a small sickle-shaped dorsal fin positioned two thirds along the body. They have a unique crescent shaped blowhole in the centre of the head facing forward. Arnouxs Beaked Whales are counter shaded, being dark above and lighter grey underneath. Many have several dark diagonal bands on the sides. They reach 9.4m in length.

General Information

Arnouxs Beaked Whales usually swim in groups of up to 16 animals although up to 80 have been seen. It is a deep water species which feeds on squid and fish and dives to depths of up to 1km. It is believed they reach maturity at around 20 years of age and may live up to 50 years. It is considered a gregarious whale.

Stranding Information

Arnouxs Beaked Whale is a rare strander with only six recorded from Australia including two in Western Australia and Tasmania. Around 40 strandings of Arnouxs Beaked Whales have been recorded in New Zealand, including several groups of up to six animals.