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Celebrating the achievements of landcarers

04/12/2017

The Tamar Island Wetland Cares Volunteer Group has been recognised in the 2017 Landcare Tasmania Awards.More

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Coracina novaehollandiae

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike
Photo copyright Dave Watts

Description

Black-faced Cuckoo-shrikes are slender, medium-sized birds (310-350mm) with light blue-grey plumage, black face and throat and white underparts.  The black wing feathers have pale edges. Sexes are similar, and young birds resemble the adults, except the black facial mask is reduced to an eye stripe. Despite their name, Cuckoo-shrikes are neither cuckoos nor shrikes.

The name is a reference to their feathers, which have similar patterns to those of cuckoos, and their beak which resembles that of shrikes.

Habitat

The Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike is found in open forest, woodland, scrub, gardens and orchards.

Diet

The diet includes insects and other invertebrates. Some fruits and seeds are also eaten.

Breeding

The nest is a surprisingly small shallow saucer of twigs and bark, bound together with cobwebs. Both partners construct the nest and care for the young birds.

Call

The call is a soft, rolling churring and a higher pitched "chereer-chereer-chereer" in flight. (Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound)
Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Distribution

The Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike is widespread and common throughout Australia, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

In Tasmania and the Bass Strait islands it is a common summer migrant, although some birds may overwinter.