Our Latest News

Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access


Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites


Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day


'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Silvereye, Zosterops lateralis

SilvereyePhoto by Peter Grant


The Silvereye is a small (to 125mm) bird with a conspicuous white eye-ring. Tasmanian birds have olive-green upperparts and a grey back, throat and breast. The flanks are chestnut and the undertail coverts are off-white.


Silvereyes occur in a wide range of habitats, from forest and scrub to orchards and gardens.


Silvereyes feed on insects, fruit and nectar. They can cause damage to commercial and domestic orchards.


During the breeding season (August to February) males and females establish small territories which they actively defend. The nest is constructed by both sexes and comprises a small, neatly woven cup of grasses, moss, hair, and other fine vegetation, bound with cobwebs. It is placed between branches in the outer foliage of shrubs or small trees. Two to four bluish-green eggs are laid. Both sexes share the ten-day incubation and the feeding of young. If conditions are suitable two to three clutches will be raised in a season.


High, sharp ‘tseep’ as a contact call and "we-wee-ee-ee-ee" in alarm. (Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound)

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2011 State of Tasmania


Silvereyes occur from Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, through the southeast, south and south-west to  Shark Bay, Western Australia. They are most common in the southeast.

In Tasmania, the species is widespread and occurs on Flinders and King islands. Most birds move north each autumn, and move back south in late winter to breed. Migrating birds can travel as far as south Queensland.