Our Latest News

Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Wineglass Bay track upgrade complete

16/10/2017

One of Tasmania's most iconic tourism experiences, the walk to Wineglass Bay from the lookout to the beach, has now re-opened after a $500,000 upgrade initiated through the Government's Tourism Infrastructure in Parks fund.
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Tourism opportunity for Tasman Island

12/10/2017

Tourists could soon enjoy the beautiful Tasman National Park from the air, as a change to the management plan could open it up for sensitive and appropriate aircraft access.More

Glow worms

Glow WormsGlow worms (Photo by Paul Flood)

Glow-worms (Arachnocampa tasmaniensis) are a spectacular underground sight. In some caves they cluster on walls and ceilings in their thousands—a myriad of blue lights resembling stars in the night sky. Being troglophiles, they also occur in moist, sheltered surface habitats such as rainforest gullies.

Glow-worms are not really worms, but the luminous larval stage of a fungus gnat. A chemical reaction in their abdomen produces a cold blue light. They are able to switch on and douse their lights at will. The larva builds a hollow, tubular nest of silk and mucous from which it suspends sticky threads up to 30 cm long. Flying insects, attracted to the lights, become trapped and are then eaten. In stream caves, the main insects caught are stoneflies, caddisflies and mayflies.

The aquatic, larval stages of these insects are carried underground by the stream. When they emerge from the water and metamorphose into adult flies, they are attracted up to the lights and become entangled in the sticky threads. Glow-worms quickly haul up the appropriate thread and consume their victim.

After several months of growth the glow-worm larva pupates inside a chrysalis, then emerges as an adult gnat. The adults live only a few days during which time they don’t feed—they have no functional mouth-parts. Instead, they mate. The female lays her eggs on the cave wall. Glow-worm colonies are dependent upon the continued availability of flying insects for their food,especially aquatic insects carried into caves by streams.

To preserve them it is important to maintain the natural conditions of stream flow and native forest within the cave catchment area. Glow-worms will stop glowing if people shine bright lights on them, or make loud noises. They are also disturbed by people passing close beneath them, and care must be taken not to brush or entangle the long threads.

Glow worms can be seen in the dense gully forest leading to Russell Falls at Mt Field National Park. In the north of the State, they are able to be seen in Marakoopa Cave, in the Mole Creek Karst National Park.