Our Latest News

Visitor safety under the spotlight in new walker safety video

16/04/2018

Visitor safety in Tasmania's national parks and reserves has received a major investment with a suite of projects, including a new feature video on bushwalking preparation and safety.More

Draft Frenchmans Cap Recreation Zone Plan 2018

12/04/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has released the Draft Recreation Zone Plan 2018 for the Frenchmans Cap area.More

Redeveloped Lake Tahune Hut now open

12/04/2018

A locally designed and built, energy-efficient and sustainable hut is now welcoming bushwalkers at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap Track in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Mt Rufus

19. Mt Rufus

time 7 hour circuit walk (18km circuit)
access Road C193 to Lake St Clair from the Lyell Highway (A10). See map
fees Park entry fees apply
facilities Visitor centre, restaurant and accommodation located at Lake St Clair
grade Level 4. Involves mountain walk from 737m to 1416m on an easy to follow track
what to take Group C items
cautions Supervise children , tracks subject to severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow and may be impassable
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

An easily accessible mountain walk giving outstanding views of Lake St Clair, Mt Olympus, Frenchmans Cap and the headwaters of the Franklin River.

Highlights

As the altitude increases, vegetation changes from eucalypt forest to patches of cool temperate rainforest in the gullies. As you climb higher, the vegetation changes again to sub-alpine forest, dominated by snow gums (Eucalyptus coccifera) and stunted rainforest. Towards the summit, alpine plant communities dominate and during late spring and early summer they provide a colourful display of fragrant flowers.

Below the summit is an area of wind and rain sculptured sandstone that forms many weird and fascinating shapes. These sandstone blocks are almost 300 million years old and once formed a continuous layer across most of Tasmania. About 165 million years ago magma intruded up through the sandstone to form dolerite, which covered the sandstone layer. Both layers have been eroded over time by wind, rain, snow and glacial action.

Below the saddle between Mt Rufus and Mt Hugel the track winds through Richea Valley, named for the pandani and scoparia plants that grow here. These plants, which are both heaths, belong to the Richea genus of plants. The beautiful colours of flowering scoparia include reds, pinks, yellows and whites.