Our Latest News

New walking experience for the Three Capes Track

13/05/2016

Three Capes Lodge Walk Pty Ltd, owned by the principles of the Tasmanian Walking Company (TWC) Rob Sherrard and Brett Godfrey, were successful in their bid for the new walking experience after an Expression of Interest process was advertised.More

New Parks Advisory Committee members

10/05/2016

Four new members have been appointed to the National Parks and Wildlife Advisory Council, following an Expression of Interest process.More

Congratulations to Working on Country graduates

22/04/2016

A partnership program between the Tasmanian Government and the Australian Government has seen four Working on Country Aboriginal rangers gain professional qualifications in land management.More

Springlawn Nature Walk

38. Springlawn Nature Walk

time 1-1.5 hours return (700m one way)
access It is half an hour from Devonport (ferry terminal). Take the
Frankford Highway (B71) to the junction of Bakers Beach Rd
(C740) and follow to the Narawntapu National Park. The last
2km of road is unsealed but suitable for all vehicles. See map
fees Park entry fees apply. Passes may be purchased from the
Narawntapu National Park Visitor Centre during business hours.
Self registration is also available outside business hours
facilities Toilets and electric barbecues are available near the start of
the walk. Powered and non-powered camping grounds are
also located in the National Park.
grade Level 2
what to take Group A items
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

The walk starts at the Narawntapu National Park Visitors Centre and meanders through a paper bark swamp forest
along a raised timber boardwalk. A bird hide along the track provides an opportunity for a rest and a look out.
When not dry, the lagoon is home to a diverse range of water birds with Springlawn often teeming with native
wildlife. When it is dry, be sure to look out for birds of prey.

Highlights

Springlawn is a fantastic place to view native wildlife. Here, common wombats, Bennetts wallaby and Tasmanian pademelon reach some of Tasmania 's highest densities. 

Before European settlement, the Forester kangaroo occurred in the general vicinity of the Park but disappeared during the 19th century. They were re-introduced to the Park in 1975 in an effort to re-establish them close to their former range and ensure conservation of the species.

The Springlawn area also has a rich concentration of birds. Here you may see a variety of robins, wrens and fantails. You may also hear the sharp call of golden whistlers. Around the lagoon over seven different species of ducks as well as herons, swans, cormorants, coots, bitterns, grebes and many other water-birds have been observed. A bird hide in the melaleuca swamp at the lagoon offers an ideal spot for birdwatching and photography. For closer viewing of birds, binoculars are recommended.