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Wielangta Road bridge construction under way

20/02/2017

Work has begun this week on the replacement of four bridges on Wielangta Road as part of a $1.2 million project to upgrade the road.More

Improving tourism assets at Heritage Landing

03/02/2017

The iconic Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Gordon River cruise tourism experience is set for a major upgrade with facilities at Heritage Landing to be upgraded.More

Opportunities for Aboriginal trainee rangers

30/01/2017

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) is seeking applications for six Aboriginal trainee rangers as part of a partnership program between the Tasmanian Government and the Australian Government's Working on Country program.More

Duck Reach

40. Duck Reach

time 1.5 hour return walk (3km one way)
access Park in Basin Road, West Launceston. Then follow the path into the Cataract Gorge grounds where you’ll find the Great Short Walks sign. Alternatively, you can walk to the Gorge from the Kings Bridge (near the Penny Royal complex) and join the Duck Reach track at the suspension bridge in the Gorge grounds. Allow 20 minutes to walk to the Duck Reach track from Kings Bridge. See map
facilities
Toilets, picnic facilities, kiosk, drinking water, swimming pool and change rooms in the Cataract Gorge ground
grade Level 3. There are some short uphill sections and approximately 190 steps each way. (The walk can be done one way if you arrange to have a car collect you from the track exit at Corin Street, above Duck Reach.)
what to take Group A items
cautions Supervise children, hazardous cliffs, unprotected track edges, flowing waters
prohibited Pets, bicycles and skateboards are not permitted.

Follow the South Esk River from Launceston’s famous Cataract Gorge to the historic Duck Reach power station. This walk will generally suit groups with children.

Highlights

Work on the Duck Reach Power Station began in 1855 but it wasn't until 1895 that the turbines began to power the new electric streetlights.

The station was destroyed by floods in 1929 and rebuilt the following year. It continued to operate until 1956. Today an interpretation centre provides a history of the station.