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New Holland Honeyeater, Phylidonyris novaehollandiae

New Holland Honeyeater New Holland Honeyeater
(Photography by Dave Watts)

Description

The New Holland Honeyeater (165-175 mm) is streaked black and white, with a distinctive large yellow wing patch and yellow edges on the outer tail feathers. It has a small white ear patch, white eye coverts and a white iris.

Males and females are similar, but females are slightly smaller in size. Young birds are browner and have a grey eye.

Habitat

The New Holland Honeyeater is a common bird that occurs singularly or in pairs within dry sclerophyll forest, tea tree scrub, coastal heath and gardens, often where grevilleas and banksias are found.

Diet

New Holland Honeyeaters are highly active birds. They feed on the nectar of flowers, fruit, insects and spiders. Most feeding takes place in lower areas of bushes and thickets.

Breeding

The large, cup-shaped nest is made of twigs, bark and grasses, bound together with spider web. It is lined with soft material and is usually placed in a bush or tree. Both sexes feed the chicks. A pair of adults may raise two or three broods in a year.

Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Call

The call is a harsh "jick" when feeding, a rapid, stacato whistle when alarmed and a high-pitched "phseet" when perching.

Distribution

Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania.