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Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Maintaining vigilance with campfires

03/11/2017

Parks and Wildlife Service staff have thanked the many campers who have heeded the restrictions placed on campfires and pot fires, but ask that park and reserve visitors continue to take care while the fire risk remains high in certain areas of the State.More

Striated Pardalote, Pardalotus striatus

Striated PardaloteStriated Pardalote
(Photograph by Dave Watts)

Description

The Striated Pardalote is a small bird (90-115mm) that shows considerable variation in plumage across its range. All birds have white eyebrows with a yellow spot in front of the eye, olive-grey backs and a white stripe in the wing with a red or yellow coloured spot at the front. The black crown may have or lack fine white stripes.

Males and females are similar in plumage and young birds are notably paler on the crown and face.

Habitat

Striated PardaloteStriated Pardalote(Photograph by Peter Tonelli)
Striated Pardalotes are widespread and can be found in most habitats with trees or shrubs, but favour eucalypt forests and woodlands and gardens.

Diet

Striated Pardalotes frequently feed in the high foliage of eucalypt trees, although occasionally come close to the ground where there are low shrubs. They eat a wide variety of insects and their larvae. Feeding often takes place in small groups.

Breeding

Striated Pardalotes form pairs or small groups of up to six birds between June and January. The nest is constructed close to the ground in a tree hollow or a tunnel excavated in an earthen bank. Three to five lustrous, white eggs are laid. Both sexes incubate and care for the young birds. Other members of the group may help with the feeding of the young.

Call

Birds maintain contact with soft trills of double or triple notes, "pick, pick" or "pick me up".
(Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound)
Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania

Distribution

Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania. The species is a winter migrant, spending the winter months in south-east mainland Australia.