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Spotted Pardalote, Pardalotus punctatus

Spotted Pardalote Spotted Pardalote
(Photograph by Dave Watts)

Description

The Spotted Pardalote is a small bird, to 95mm. The crown, wings and tail of the male are black and covered with small, distinct white spots. Males have a pale eyebrow, a yellow throat and undertail and a red rump.

Females are similar but duller in colour and with less-distinct markings.

Habitat

The Spotted Pardalote is mostly found in eucalypt forests and woodlands but also occurs in parks and gardens with well-established eucalypt canopies. It usually occurs high in the canopy, so it is most easily detected by its characteristic call.

Diet

The species forages singularly or in pairs on the foliage of trees for insects, especially psyllids (tiny sap-sucking insects), and sugary secretions from leaves.

Breeding

The Spotted Pardalote's nest is an enlarged, lined chamber at the end of a narrow tunnel, excavated in an earth bank. The breeding season runs from September to January. Both parents share nest-building, incubation of the three to five eggs and feeding of the young when they hatch.

Call

A slow, repeated, high-pitched call, "pee-too" or a rapid, double or triple, high-pitched, "pee-pee".
(Audio recordings courtesy of David Stewart/Nature Sound)
 

Distribution

Found in suitable habitat throughout Tasmania except in the far south-west.


Distribution Map courtesy Natural Values Atlas, data from theLIST
© 2010 State of Tasmania